WCC-UK |

Mid-Career Event

by

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is organising an event aimed at mid-career scholars, to be held on Monday 26th March 2018 in the Classics Department, Durham University, from 11am to 4.30pm. These times allow for same-day rail travel from as far as St Andrews and London.

Attendees at our first mid-career workshop in December 2016 reported that they found it incredibly helpful in developing their ideas and strategies concerning the issues and challenges that face women academics at mid-career, and as a result we plan to make this an annual event, held in different venues around the country in turn. Topics to be discussed may include decisions about whether and when to move institutions, questions around disciplinarity/interdisciplinarity and collaboration in research, expectations about international mobility and balancing this with family/caring duties, managing institutional expectations (which may be gendered) around types and levels of administrative service, taking on leadership positions, and strategies to tackle unconscious bias in the workplace. Those who register their interest in participating will be invited to fill in an online questionnaire, the results of which will inform the precise choice of topics for discussion sessions. We envisage that the day’s discussions will help to set priorities for resource development and future campaigns by the Women’s Classical Committee.

The WCC recognises that the term ‘mid-career’ is open to a range of interpretations, but also that different challenges face women in classics in different situations and career stages. This event is aimed primarily at women who have already achieved employment stability and established a publication profile. If the event is oversubscribed then we will give priority to women in this situation, but we welcome applications to register from anyone of any gender who feels they would benefit from attending.

To declare your interest in participating in this event please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/womens-classical-committee-uk-mid-career-event-tickets-41832029727 by Monday 5 February 2018. The workshop is free to WCC UK members; for non-members the cost is £10 per head, to cover provision of lunch and other refreshments. The venue will be accessible to all participants.

Dr Stephe Harrop (Liverpool Hope), Dr Jo Paul (Open), Dr Amy Russell (Durham)

For any queries about this event, please contact womensclassicalcommittee@gmail.com. For more information on the Women’s Classical Committee, including our aims and activities and how to join, please see https://wcc-uk.blogs.sas.ac.uk/.

Child-friendly policy

The Women’s Classical Committee is committed to making our events as inclusive as possible, and recognises that the financial and practical challenges of childcare often impede people from participating in workshops and conferences. Anyone who needs to bring a dependent child or children with them in order to participate in one of our events is usually welcome to do so, but we ask you to inform of us this in advance so that we can take them into account in our event planning and risk assessment. The safety and well-being of any children brought to our events remain at all times the responsibility of the parent or carer. While we do our best to ensure that rest and changing facilities are available for those who may need them, this will depend on the individual venue we are using. Again, please contact us in advance to discuss your needs, and we will do our best to accommodate them.

WCC UK Steering Committee elections

by

Elections are now open for two positions on the Steering Committee of the WCC UK for April 2018 to April 2022. The Steering Committee runs the WCC UK, including organizing events, workshops, and overseeing future development of the WCC UK. Committee members serve for four years, and may stand for a second consecutive term. Four members of the WCC UK have been nominated to stand for election to the Steering Committee. A short CV and statement have been provided by each candidate for review by members of the WCC UK prior to voting.

Voting opens on 21st December 2017 and will run until 9th February 2018. The elected members will be announced in late February, and will assume office at the AGM in April of 2018. If you are a member of the WCC UK in good standing, you will receive an email with a link for voting online. If you do not receive an email or have any questions, please contact the Elections Officer, Virginia L. Campbell, virginialcampbell at gmail.com.

Candidates

Ellie Mackin Roberts (click here to read statement and CV)

Fiona Mitchell (click here to read statement and CV)

Christine Plastow (click here to read statement and CV)

Laurence Totelin (click here to read statement and CV)

Save the date: second WCC-UK mid-career event

by

Have you fallen off a mentorship cliff? Are you wondering how to balance research, teaching, and administrative service? Do you wonder how, or if, you should move into leadership positions? Are you struggling to find work-life balance as a university academic?

Following the success of our December 2016 event, the Women’s Classical Committee UK is organising a second day of informal discussion focusing on the issues and challenges facing mid-career scholars. We will meet on Monday 26th March 2018 at Durham University from 11.30am to 5pm, which should allow train travel on the day from as far as St Andrews, Oxford, Cambridge, or London. The programme will be tailored to the interests and needs of those attending.

This event is aimed primarily at women Classicists who have already achieved employment stability and established a publication profile but have not yet, or have only recently, been promoted to Professor. If the event is oversubscribed we will give priority to applicants who fit this description, but all are welcome. It will be free to members and £10 for non-members, to include lunch, and the usual WCC event policies will apply (meaning that you are welcome to bring a child or children with you, and that we aim to meet all participants’ accessibility needs).

Keep an eye open for fuller details and registration, here and on the Liverpool List, in the new year!

Late Antique Empresses at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, July 2018

by

The International Medieval Congress, held annually at the University of Leeds, is the biggest event on the European medieval studies calendar. The 2017 conference hosted 2,100 actively-involved participants coming from over fifty countries to present their research or contribute to round-table discussions. The WCC established a presence at the IMC in 2017 with two round-tables on feminist pedagogy and periodisation. Following the success of these events, the WCC is pleased to announce that a double-panel on late antique empresses will feature at the forthcoming IMC, organised by Prof. Julia Hillner (University of Sheffield) and Dr Victoria Leonard (Institute of Classical Studies, London). The panels are jointly sponsored by the WCC and the Medieval and Ancient Research Centre, University of Sheffield (MARCUS).

All are welcome!

***

Session 218 – Mon. 02 July – 14.15-15.45 

Panel 1: The Late Antique Empress, I: How to Read, Write, and View Imperial Women

Historical studies on late antique empresses have usually been biographies of well-known empresses or single dynasties. This session – the first of two proposed – offers an interdisciplinary perspective on imperial women’s representation and agency. It explores three methodological approaches to the topic: biography, topography, and iconography. Paper
A assesses the benefits and challenges of the biographical approach in light of gender history; paper B investigates how the study of public space impacts on our understanding of imperial women’s role at court; and paper C analyses the relationship between the late antique empress’s image and the cult of the Virgin Mary.

Organised by Julia Hillner, Department of History, University of Sheffield and Victoria Leonard, Institute of Classical Studies, University of London

Chaired by Robin Whelan, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) / Brasenose College, University of Oxford

Paper A: Julia Hillner, ‘Empress, Interrupted: Writing the Biography of a Late Antique Imperial Woman’
Paper B: Robert Heffron, Department of History, University of Sheffield, ‘Women on the Move: Representations of Imperial Women and Urban Space in Late Antique Rome and Constantinople’
Paper C: Maria Lidova, British Museum, London / Wolfson College, University of Oxford, ‘Late Antique Empresses and the Queen of Heaven: On the Correlation between   Sacred and Secular in the Imagery of a Female Potentate’

***

Session 318 – Mon. 02 July – 16.30-18.00

Panel 2: The Late Antique Empress, II: Imperial Women between Court Politics and ‘Barbarian’ Kings

This is the second session offering new work on late antique empresses. It focuses on case studies that are rarely discussed or in need of reassessment, as they have significant things to tell us about late antique ecclesiastical, military and political developments. Paper A investigates the changing relationship between state and church through Justina’s role in 4th-century Milan; paper B asks how a reinterpretation of Galla Placidia’s Visigothic marriage as war captivity affects our understanding of Roman-Barbarian relationships; and paper C explores the rising power of late 5th-century imperial women through the burial of the disgraced Verina by her daughter, Ariadne.

Organised by Julia Hillner, Department of History, University of Sheffield and Victoria Leonard, Institute of Classical Studies, University of London

Chaired by Richard Flower, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Exeter

Paper A: Belinda Washington, Independent Scholar, Edinburgh, ‘Reviewing the Roles of 4th-Century Imperial Women: The Case of Justina’
Paper B: Victoria Leonard, ‘Galla Placidia as ‘Human Gold’: Consent and Autonomy in the Early 5th-Century Western Mediterranean’
Paper C: Margarita Vallejo-Girvés, Departamento de Historia y Filosofía, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, ‘Return of the Confined Empress: The Burial of Verina’

***

If you can’t attend in person follow on Twitter: Victoria Leonard (@tigerlilyrocks) and Julia Hillner (@WritingHelena)

Event – LGBT+ Classics: Teaching, Research, Activism

by

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is delighted to announce the following event:

LGBT+ Classics: Teaching, Research, Activism
Monday, 12th February 2018
University of Reading

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is organising a one-day workshop on Classics and Queer studies to highlight current projects and activities that embrace the intersections of research, teaching, public engagement, and activism.

The day will bring together academics in Classics (and related fields), LGBT+ activists, museum curators and those working in other areas of outreach and public engagement. We will explore how LGBT+ themes are included in Classics curricula; how public engagement with queer Classics and history of sexualities can contribute to fight homophobia and transphobia; and the ways in which the boundaries between research, teaching, and activism can be crossed. We will also discuss strategies of support for LGBT+ students and staff, current policies in Higher Education, and what still needs to be improved. We hope to create an atmosphere of sharing experiences, knowledge, and ideas among all the participants to further queering our discipline.

 

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

09.45 – Registration desk opens

10.15 – Welcome and Introduction, with a written message from Deborah Kamen (Seattle), Co-Chair of the Lambda Classical Caucus, USA

10.30 – Sebastian Matzner (KCL, London): Queer Connections: Classics and the Gay Science

10.55 – Beth Asbury, Jozie Kettle, Clara Barker (Oxford): Out in Oxford: Hidden Stories in Plain Sight

11.30 – Coffee break

11.45 – Spotlight Talks

Alan Greaves (Liverpool): Transgender Lives in Classics: An Example of Museum-based Learning
Kate Nichols (Birmingham): Working with Students to Queer University Collections
Rebecca Mellor (York): Queer There and Everywhere
Chris Mowat (Newcastle): The Place of Classics in LGBT Public History
Mara Gold (Oxford): Beyond Sappho: Classics and the Development of Modern Lesbian Culture
Jessica Moody (Birkbeck): Lesbian Hellenism? How Fin de Siècle Female Classicists Challenged our Queer Histories

13.00 – Lunch – in the same building as the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, which will be open to visitors until 5.15pm

14.00 – Jen Grove and Rebecca Langlands (Exeter): Ancient Artefacts and Sex Education: Exploring Gender and Sexual Diversity with the University of Exeter’s “Sex & History” project

14.35 – Cheryl Morgan (co-chair of OutStories Bristol): How Not to Erase Trans History

15.00 – Nicki Ward (Birmingham): Sharing Good Practice: A Model for Embedding LGBTQ Inclusivity in the Curriculum

15.25 – Maria Moscati (Sussex): Starting as Researcher and Becoming an Activist

15.50 – Coffee break

16.05 –  Round table on policies and support strategies with Clara Barker (Oxford), Simon Chandler-Wilde (Reading), Deb Heighes (Reading), Alan Greaves (Liverpool) Alyssa Henley (SupportU), and Jessica Moody (ECU).

16.35 – Concluding discussion

17.15 – Keynote address by Jennifer Ingleheart (Durham):

Queer Classics: Sexuality, Scholarship, and the Personal from a Personal Perspective
And in the Life and Work of A.E. Housman

18.15 – Drinks reception

 

Please note that this programme will be updated as necessary.

 

***

The event is organised by Katherine Harloe (k.c.harloe at reading.ac.uk), Talitha Kearey (tezk2 at cam.ac.uk), and Irene Salvo (isalvo at uni-goettingen.de). 

Attendance is free for WCC UK members, £10 for non-members (to cover catering costs). You can join the WCC UK here (and if you’re a student, underemployed, or unemployed, membership is only £5). Travel bursaries will be available for students and the un/under-employed.

If you would like to attend this event, registration is now open on Eventbrite. You will need to register both for the workshop and the keynote. You can attend either or both of them but they are separate tickets – workshop registration is here and keynote registration is here. Members of the WCC UK are entitled to complimentary tickets and have been sent instructions on how to order them; if you need a reminder, please e-mail us at womensclassicalcommittee at gmail dot com.

The WCC is committed to providing friendly and accessible environments for its events, so please do get in touch if you have any access, dietary, or childcare enquiries.

Child-friendly policy

The Women’s Classical Committee is committed to making our events as inclusive as possible, and recognises that the financial and practical challenges of childcare often impede people from participating in workshops and conferences. Anyone who needs to bring a dependent child or children with them in order to participate in one of our events is usually welcome to do so, but we ask you to inform of us this in advance so that we can take them into account in our event planning and risk assessment. The safety and well-being of any children brought to our events remain at all times the responsibility of the parent or carer. While we do our best to ensure that rest and changing facilities are available for those who may need them, this will depend on the individual venue we are using. Again, please contact us in advance to discuss your needs, and we will do our best to accommodate them.

 

***

The event LGBT+ Classics is generously supported by the School of Humanities of the University of Reading, the University of Reading Diversity and Inclusion Fund, and by the Collaborative Research Centre 1136 Education and Religion at the University of Goettingen.

WCC UK Steering committee elections – call for nominations

by

Nominations are being solicited for joining the Steering Committee of the Women’s Classical Committee UK. The Steering Committee runs the WCC UK, including organizing events, workshops, and future development of the WCC UK. Committee members will serve for four years, with the option to renew for a further four year term. The Steering Committee wishes to encourage a diverse organization comprised of representatives from any background, location, or career level.

You may nominate someone or nominate yourself. Nominees must be members of the WCC UK in good standing (please check with Carol Atack, carolatack AT gmail DOT com, if you are unsure of your membership status). Names of nominees should be submitted to Virginia Campbell, the Elections Officer, by the 30th of November 2017. 

The Elections Officer will contact nominees for permission to place their candidacy on the ticket. The Elections Officer will require a short CV (1 page) and an election statement from each nominee. These will be put on the WCC UK website for members to review prior to voting.

Voting will open on the 15th of December and run until the 15th of February. The elected members will be announced in late February, and will assume office at the AGM in April 2018.

If you have any questions about the Steering Committee or the process of elections, please e-mail us at womensclassicalcommittee AT gmail DOT com.

Call for Papers: LGBT+ Classics: Teaching, Research, and Activism

by

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is delighted to announce the following event:

LGBT+ Classics: Teaching, Research, and Activism
12th February 2018
University of Reading
Organised by: Katherine Harloe, Talitha Kearey, and Irene Salvo

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is organising a one-day workshop on Classics and Queer studies to highlight current projects and activities that embrace the intersections of research, teaching, public engagement, and activism.

The day will feature a series of talks and a roundtable bringing together academics in Classics (and related fields), LGBT+ activists, museum curators and those working in other areas of outreach and public engagement. We intend to explore how LGBT+ themes are included in Classics curricula; how public engagement with queer Classics and history of sexualities can contribute to fight homophobia and transphobia; and the ways in which the boundaries between research, teaching, and activism can be crossed. The roundtable will focus in particular on strategies of support for LGBT+ students and staff, current policies in Higher Education, and what still needs to be improved. Confirmed speakers include: Beth Asbury, Clara Barker, Alan Greaves, Jennifer Grove, Rebecca Langlands, Sebastian Matzner, Cheryl Morgan, Nicki Ward, and Maria Moscati. Jennifer Ingleheart (Durham) will deliver the keynote address ‘Queer Classics: sexuality, scholarship, and the personal’.

We are also reserving time during the day’s schedule for a series of short (five-minute) spotlight talks by delegates. Through this session, we hope to provide a chance for delegates to share research projects, teaching programmes, and experiences related to LGBT+ issues. We are particularly interested in spotlight talks on:

  • new, queer and gender-informed work in classics, ancient history, archaeology, papyrology, philosophy, or classical reception;
  • fresh ideas on teaching the history of queerness through texts and material culture;
  • the difficulties and discriminatory experiences encountered by members of staff, undergraduate and postgraduate students, and early-career researchers, because of their gender identity and/or sexual orientation.

If you would like more information or to volunteer to give one of these talks, please send a brief description of your talk (about 80/150 words) to Irene Salvo, LBGT+ liaison officer, salvoirene AT gmail DOT com. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday 5th December 2017.

People of any gender expression or identity who support the WCC’s aims are welcome to attend this event; further details are available at our About Us page.

Attendance is free for WCC UK members, £10 for non-members (to cover catering costs). You can join the WCC UK here (and if you’re a student, underemployed, or unemployed, membership is only £5). As with all WCC events, travel bursaries will be available for students and the un/under-employed.

The WCC is committed to providing friendly and accessible environments for its events, so please do get in touch if you have any access, dietary, or childcare enquiries. The full statement of our childcare policy is here.

Nominations to the REF sub-panel by the Women’s Classical Committee UK

by

The Women’s Classical Committe UK intends to nominate members to the REF Classics sub-panel.  We ask candidates seeking nomination by the WCC UK to provide answers to the questions below (in brief bullet points) by 30th November 2017, and to send them to the WCC UK’s current co-chair Amy Russell (amy.russell AT durham DOT ac DOT uk). The questions mirror those asked in the HEFCE nomination form, with the addition of question six which is specific to the WCC UK.

We seek candidates who are research users as well as those who are active researchers. Candidates may familiarize themselves with the role and duties of sub-panel members, including the workload and provisional timetable.

We will be making nomination decisions based on the published HEFCE criteria (captured in these questions), with the additional criterion that your nomination should further the WCC UK’s aims (for which see question 6). We will evaluate candidates of all genders according to the same criteria. Forms will be circulated to our Steering Committee and Liaisons for comment, before a final nomination decision is made by a small sub-committee formed from current SC members. A full list of SC members and liaisons can be found on our website. We do not intend to publish the list of those nominated by WCC UK.

Please circulate this call for applications widely, as we welcome nominations or suggestions for nomination from the broadest pool of candidates possible.

Questions for Candidates for Nomination

Please answer the following questions:

1. Do you have previous REF panel experience? Give details.

2. What modern languages are you able to assess in?

3. What are your areas of expertise, including (if applicable) experience in wider use and benefits of research?

4. Provide evidence in support of your nomination (e.g. key achievements and academic appointments; esteem indicators such as editorial posts; experience of research management, commissioning, using or benefitting from research; experience of leading/managing/practising interdisciplinary research; experience of peer review, research quality standards, or of evaluating impact, benefits, or quality of research).

5. Do you wish to be considered for nomination as an interdisciplinary research adviser?

6. How will your appointment to the sub-panel help to advance WCC UK’s published aims? Our aims are:

– Support women* in classics**
– Promote feminist and gender-informed perspectives in classics
– Raise the profile of the study of women in antiquity and classical reception
– Advance equality and diversity in classics

* By ‘women’ we include all those who self-define as women, including (if they wish) those with complex gender identities which include ‘woman’, and those who experience oppression as women.
** By ‘classics’ we understand the study of the ancient Mediterranean world and its reception, including but not limited to scholarship by students and post-holders in academic departments of Classics and Ancient History.

Against Classics

by

Dr. Jo Quinn, Associate Professor of Ancient History at Oxford, gave a keynote talk at our AGM in April which asked us to consider what precisely our curriculum is covering. We are delighted that she has written up her thoughts in this blog post. You can find her on Twitter at @josephinequinn.

Despite all the efforts made in recent years to increase the diversity of Classicists by organisations like Classics for All and now the WCC as well as by university departments, it is no secret that our student body is still dominated by those from privileged backgrounds, that our secure and senior faculty are disproportionately male, and that BME scholars are disproportionately absent at all levels. I want to suggest here that ‘Classics’ itself is part of the problem: that we stack the odds against diversity by the way we describe and conceptualise our subject.

Classics is not after all a neutral term. For one thing, this eighteenth century coinage privileges language and literature: the “classics” concerned are Greek and Roman texts. It comes from an era when most of the available evidence was indeed textual, but it does not represent the breadth of the subject as we teach it today. It also dictates a focus on elites, on men, and on people we now at least perceive as white – not only because the writers of these texts overwhelmingly fit this description, but because the people they wrote about do too.

And even if we are okay with a primary focus on texts over history, archaeology, linguistics, and so on, do we really believe that the Greek and Latin texts we teach are the only ‘classics’ of world, or even western, literature? The extended usage in ‘Classical Civilization’ raises similar questions: why are (only) Greece and Rome ‘classical’?

This raises another question: why do we limit ourselves to Greece and Rome anyway? As researchers, of course, we often don’t. The WCC’s definition of Classics as “the study of the ancient Mediterranean world and its reception” isn’t controversial among practitioners. But our teaching curriculum is still based around the Greeks and Romans, and this is the way we usually present Classics degrees to prospective students – at Oxford, for instance, “Classics is the study of the languages, culture, history and thought of the civilisations of ancient Greece and Rome”, and similar sentiments can be found at (just to take a few more examples) Durham, Exeter, Reading, and Liverpool. Even where courses on other places and people are on offer, and where faculty research interests are much broader, these aren’t what our websites sell as ‘Classics’.

If Greek and Roman studies is really what we are teaching, why not just call it that? One reason is that our explicit focus solely on societies associated with the two languages that characterize a widespread stereotype of elite education in the UK already limits the diversity of our applicants – and the fact that even in elite schools those languages are taught for longer and more intensively to boys means that women are always going to have a harder time reaching the top of the profession. Another, more positive reason to rethink the narrow geographical and cultural confines of our courses is that curriculum diversity of all kinds is a powerful tool in attracting and engaging more diverse students, who will then become more diverse faculty.

The problem is that we are trying to diversify a subject whose borders we have intentionally constrained – and so however much we try to change the game, the rules by which we play ensure that the status quo prevails. If we really want diversity, we need to relinquish our nineteenth-century disciplinary framework.

One option would be to split Classics up into its component parts: there’s already a trend for separate degrees in ancient history and/or classical archaeology, and for ancient history to be grouped institutionally with history, classical archaeology with archaeology.

A risk with generalizing this approach, however, is that even fewer students from schools that don’t teach Greek and Latin have the opportunity to learn the languages that will give them a direct encounter with the words and ideas of the people they study, as well as a good chance of a research career. Another, from the perspective of language and literature specialists, is that the parlous position of modern languages in the UK and elsewhere does not offer an encouraging example of going it alone.

Better I think would be to do the opposite: join forces with neighouring departments with a focus on antiquity such as Near Eastern Studies and Archaeology, if not at departmental level then at least in terms of our degree courses. We could start by simply counting each other’s courses towards our own degrees. And we could require all our students to learn at least one ancient language from scratch at university, abolishing the ridiculous unfairness whereby Classics students who have had the unusual privilege of learning Greek and Latin at school get a pass on basic language training at university, luxuriating in the further fields of subjects they have studied for years while their less-expensively educated peers battle with one or both languages as well as with a whole new world.

Event report: Bullying and Harassment in UK Classics Departments: Finding Solutions

by

The workshop Bullying and Harassment in the UK Classical Workplace: Finding Solutions took place on 11th September 2017 at Roehampton, and was organised by Professor Fiona McHardy, Dr. Katerina Volioti and WCC UK steering committee member Dr. Susan Deacy. The programme is detailed here. In this blog post, Susan reports back on the thinking behind running the event, how it all went, and where we go from here.

 

At the WCC-UK AGM in April 2017, I was struck that there seemed to be a shift from the inaugural AGM in 2016. In 2016, there had been a focus on problems that WCC might address in Classics. Now there was a move towards how WCC could address some of these problems. The presentation at the 2017 AGM from Dr. Anna Bull of the 1752 Group fitted this shift. Anna’s presentation raised some problems that run deep in HE culture around sexual harassment, but Anna identified various possible actions, including some do-able steps that individuals can take, and these can make a difference. It was in a similar spirit that Fiona, Katerina and I organised an event looking for possible solutions to bullying and harassment in UK Classics. Fiona and I had already written a paper that was problem-focused. It was a goal of this new event to discuss ways forward.

A number of people contacted me once the Call for Papers had gone out to give support or relate their experiences. Some were torn between coming along to help ensure that others will not go through what they had – and keeping these experiences in the past. And it was the latter that won out. This included attempting to go through institutional policies: one respondent (not a classicist) told me that they only had any success when the union at their HEI was serious about legal action for failure in duty of care. The perpetrators left, but for other institutions. This academic highlighted weak management and peer silence as practices that ‘give permission’ to bullying. Another person who got in touch – a classicist – had experiences of ‘gagging orders’ which can create a ‘wall of silence’ that allow some individuals to bully a succession of colleagues. Correspondents also discussed the ways in which universities can make their staff insecure at all stages in their careers. This culture not only mitigates against a good working environment, but it also discourages whistle-blowing, as people feel scared to put their necks on the line, for the sake of their careers.

Everyone present at the event, the programme for which is available here, was there because the topic mattered to them and/or to others close to them. We agreed to keep discussion in camera, so no twitter. Among the key issues raised were the following – and there is plenty here that WCC can explore further.

Continue reading →

< Older Posts